ReSRC Simple Example

Prac­tice in research

2016 – present

Research Poster

Research Poster

State­ment of intent
The cre­ative indus­tries is the UK’s fastest grow­ing eco­nomic sec­tor yet faces an uncer­tain future as GCSE design stu­dent num­bers con­tinue to decline. With this trend expected to con­tinue, ques­tions need to be raised at pol­icy level to avoid a tal­ent pool cri­sis beyond 2020: is the UK fully equip­ping the next gen­er­a­tion of design­ers for indus­try par­a­digm shift? Can there be a pos­i­tive out­look beyond the EU Brexit ref­er­en­dum and use its out­come to leave as a launch­pad to com­pete in the emerg­ing mar­ket of digi­tised manufacturing.

This research project does not intend to reignite the Stem/​Steam debate. Rather, the pri­mary focus is what’s beyond it; for design think­ing 2020 and pilot whether or not these aims have rel­e­vance to move for­ward and make a sig­nif­i­cant con­tri­bu­tion to a larger project. The research lan­guage and deliv­ery is intended for a non-​design audience.

Research ques­tion
What is the roadmap for cre­ative prac­tice and design edu­ca­tion beyond Stem/​Steam in the UK? Are we prepar­ing the next gen­er­a­tion of cre­ative tal­ent for the third indus­trial rev­o­lu­tion? Will the UK Brexit ref­er­en­dum be an enabler or an inhibitor for UK design think­ing 2020?

Meth­ods
Grounded the­ory (Glaser and Strauss, 1967) will be used for gath­er­ing and analysing qual­i­ta­tive data in the form of focus group, in-​depth inter­view and obser­va­tion. This method works in oppo­site to the pos­i­tivist tra­di­tion of research. Cress­well (1998) sug­gests that in using grounded the­ory; “The researcher has to set aside the­o­ret­i­cal ideas to allow a ‘sub­stan­tive’ the­ory to emerge.” Quan­ti­ta­tive (online sur­vey) data will sup­port the dis­cov­ered theory.

This approach intends to draw out the insights from the stake­hold­ers, and the cre­ative and tech­no­log­i­cal aspi­ra­tions of Gen Z stu­dents, and inves­ti­gate if there is a correlation.

Sec­ondary research will con­sist of review­ing his­tor­i­cal archives from the Design Research Soci­ety (DRS) and the RCA’s Depart­ment of Design Research (DDR). To con­tex­tu­alise the his­tor­i­cal and the cur­rent dis­cus­sion points, there will be ongo­ing cur­rent lit­er­a­ture reviews from the Depart­ment for Edu­ca­tion, Cre­ative Indus­tries Fed­er­a­tion and selected aca­d­e­mic journals.

Addi­tion­ally, prac­tice in research will con­sist of a web­site to dis­sem­i­nate key research meth­ods and insights: www​.design​think​ing2020​.com.

Eth­i­cal issues
The British Soci­o­log­i­cal Asso­ci­a­tion code of ethics states, “Guar­an­tees of con­fi­den­tial­ity and anonymity given to research par­tic­i­pants must be hon­oured unless there are clear and over­rid­ing rea­sons to do oth­er­wise.” . This research project fore­sees no rea­son for respon­dent disclosure.

All respon­dents will sign a con­sent form before the inter­view, stat­ing their rights to con­fi­den­tial­ity, anonymity and, upon request, copies of the mate­ri­als gath­ered. Given, at any point dur­ing field­work a respon­dent may opt out.

Ini­tial find­ings
There is a rich his­tory of design think­ing for edu­ca­tion in the UK and it is timely to revisit the exten­sive work Bruce Archer (19222005), the DRS and DDR under­took in the mid 1970s in order to con­tex­tu­alise and might go some way to answer­ing the cur­rent issues.

Art and design in stu­dent uptake in schools at GCSE level has decreased from 440,000 in 2004 to less than 190,000 this year, an aver­age drop of 43%. [source: Joint Coun­cil for Qual­i­fi­ca­tions (JCQ). Design has been pushed aside in favour of Eng­lish, Math­e­mat­ics His­tory or Geog­ra­phy the sci­ences and a lan­guage viz the core sub­jects for the EBacc cur­ricu­lum. The first year of stu­dents to sit GCSE exams for the EBacc will be in 2020. Gen Z Stu­dents in the US con­sider cre­ativ­ity and tech­nol­ogy their defin­ing char­ac­ter­is­tics, learn best by doing/​creating, are only some­what pre­pared for their future and want more of a focus on cre­ativ­ity in the classroom.

Under Hori­zon 2020, the EU Frame­work Pro­gramme for Research and Inno­va­tion, Fac­to­ries of the Future (FoF) are using dig­i­tal tech­nol­ogy to trans­form OEM’s to retail stores in the “Third Indus­trial Rev­o­lu­tion.” The total bud­get in cur­rent prices for Hori­zon is nearly €80 billion.

Key ref­er­ences
Bruce Archer: “Time for a Rev­o­lu­tion in Art and Design Edu­ca­tion” 1978 and “The Nature of Research into Design and Design Edu­ca­tion.” 1992. Ken Fried­man: “Cre­at­ing Design Knowl­edge: From Research into Prac­tice.” 2000. Christo­pher Frayling: “Research in Art and Design (Royal Col­lege of Art Research Papers)” 1993. Andy Kirk: “Data Visu­al­i­sa­tion, A Hand­book for Data Dri­ven Design” 2016. Jon Kolko:“Design Think­ing Comes of Age.” Har­vard Busi­ness Review 93, no. 9 (Sep­tem­ber 2015). Kosk­i­nen, Ilpo Kalevi, ed: “Design Research Through Prac­tice: From the Lab, Field, and Show­room” 2011. Sharon Poggen­pohl: “Design Inte­gra­tions: Research and Col­lab­o­ra­tion” 2009.

State­ment of intent
The cre­ative indus­tries is the UK’s fastest grow­ing eco­nomic sec­tor yet faces an uncer­tain future as GCSE design stu­dent num­bers con­tinue to decline. With this trend expected to con­tinue, ques­tions need to be raised at pol­icy level to avoid a tal­ent pool cri­sis beyond 2020: is the UK fully equip­ping the next gen­er­a­tion of design­ers for indus­try par­a­digm shift? Can there be a pos­i­tive out­look beyond the EU Brexit ref­er­en­dum and use its out­come to leave as a launch­pad to com­pete in the emerg­ing mar­ket of digi­tised manufacturing.

This research project does not intend to reignite the Stem/​Steam debate. Rather, the pri­mary focus is what’s beyond it; for design think­ing 2020 and pilot whether or not these aims have rel­e­vance to move for­ward and make a sig­nif­i­cant con­tri­bu­tion to a larger project. The research lan­guage and deliv­ery is intended for a non-​design audience.

Research ques­tion
What is the roadmap for cre­ative prac­tice and design edu­ca­tion beyond Stem/​Steam in the UK? Are we prepar­ing the next gen­er­a­tion of cre­ative tal­ent for the third indus­trial rev­o­lu­tion? Will the UK Brexit ref­er­en­dum be an enabler or an inhibitor for UK design think­ing 2020?

Meth­ods
Grounded the­ory (Glaser and Strauss, 1967) will be used for gath­er­ing and analysing qual­i­ta­tive data in the form of focus group, in-​depth inter­view and obser­va­tion. This method works in oppo­site to the pos­i­tivist tra­di­tion of research. Cress­well (1998) sug­gests that in using grounded the­ory; “The researcher has to set aside the­o­ret­i­cal ideas to allow a ‘sub­stan­tive’ the­ory to emerge.” Quan­ti­ta­tive (online sur­vey) data will sup­port the dis­cov­ered theory.

This approach intends to draw out the insights from the stake­hold­ers, and the cre­ative and tech­no­log­i­cal aspi­ra­tions of Gen Z stu­dents, and inves­ti­gate if there is a correlation.

Sec­ondary research will con­sist of review­ing his­tor­i­cal archives from the Design Research Soci­ety (DRS) and the RCA’s Depart­ment of Design Research (DDR). To con­tex­tu­alise the his­tor­i­cal and the cur­rent dis­cus­sion points, there will be ongo­ing cur­rent lit­er­a­ture reviews from the Depart­ment for Edu­ca­tion, Cre­ative Indus­tries Fed­er­a­tion and selected aca­d­e­mic journals.

Addi­tion­ally, prac­tice in research will con­sist of a web­site to dis­sem­i­nate key research meth­ods and insights: www​.design​think​ing2020​.com.

Eth­i­cal issues
The British Soci­o­log­i­cal Asso­ci­a­tion code of ethics states, “Guar­an­tees of con­fi­den­tial­ity and anonymity given to research par­tic­i­pants must be hon­oured unless there are clear and over­rid­ing rea­sons to do oth­er­wise.” . This research project fore­sees no rea­son for respon­dent disclosure.

All respon­dents will sign a con­sent form before the inter­view, stat­ing their rights to con­fi­den­tial­ity, anonymity and, upon request, copies of the mate­ri­als gath­ered. Given, at any point dur­ing field­work a respon­dent may opt out.

Ini­tial find­ings
There is a rich his­tory of design think­ing for edu­ca­tion in the UK and it is timely to revisit the exten­sive work Bruce Archer (19222005), the DRS and DDR under­took in the mid 1970s in order to con­tex­tu­alise and might go some way to answer­ing the cur­rent issues.

Art and design in stu­dent uptake in schools at GCSE level has decreased from 440,000 in 2004 to less than 190,000 this year, an aver­age drop of 43%. [source: Joint Coun­cil for Qual­i­fi­ca­tions (JCQ). Design has been pushed aside in favour of Eng­lish, Math­e­mat­ics His­tory or Geog­ra­phy the sci­ences and a lan­guage viz the core sub­jects for the EBacc cur­ricu­lum. The first year of stu­dents to sit GCSE exams for the EBacc will be in 2020. Gen Z Stu­dents in the US con­sider cre­ativ­ity and tech­nol­ogy their defin­ing char­ac­ter­is­tics, learn best by doing/​creating, are only some­what pre­pared for their future and want more of a focus on cre­ativ­ity in the classroom.

Under Hori­zon 2020, the EU Frame­work Pro­gramme for Research and Inno­va­tion, Fac­to­ries of the Future (FoF) are using dig­i­tal tech­nol­ogy to trans­form OEM’s to retail stores in the “Third Indus­trial Rev­o­lu­tion.” The total bud­get in cur­rent prices for Hori­zon is nearly €80 billion.

Key ref­er­ences
Bruce Archer: “Time for a Rev­o­lu­tion in Art and Design Edu­ca­tion” 1978 and “The Nature of Research into Design and Design Edu­ca­tion.” 1992. Ken Fried­man: “Cre­at­ing Design Knowl­edge: From Research into Prac­tice.” 2000. Christo­pher Frayling: “Research in Art and Design (Royal Col­lege of Art Research Papers)” 1993. Andy Kirk: “Data Visu­al­i­sa­tion, A Hand­book for Data Dri­ven Design” 2016. Jon Kolko:“Design Think­ing Comes of Age.” Har­vard Busi­ness Review 93, no. 9 (Sep­tem­ber 2015). Kosk­i­nen, Ilpo Kalevi, ed: “Design Research Through Prac­tice: From the Lab, Field, and Show­room” 2011. Sharon Poggen­pohl: “Design Inte­gra­tions: Research and Col­lab­o­ra­tion” 2009.